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The Legendary Buckwheat Zydeco has passed away

 Buckwheat Zydeco

Buckwheat Zydeco

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana Sad news was received about Buckwheat Zydeco. He passed away on September 24, 2016 from cancer. Stanley Dural, also known as Buckwheat Zydeco, will be greatly missed.  To mark his passing, I am running the following article that I previously posted  on this site, September 2015. Rest in peace.

As a young child growing up in Lafayette, Louisiana, Stanley Dural, Jr. was said to look like the Little Rascal’s character “Buckwheat” in the Our Gang comedy series filmed during the 1930’s. This whimsical image was to stick with him his entire life as a professional musician. Drawing from his musical roots, the artist who became known as Buckwheat Zydeco,has shown that he is not afraid to move forward and reach beyond the Zydeco traditions to become a legend in American music.

Zydeco music evolved from the French speaking musicians who played at house dances who blended blues, rhythm and blues and the music of the indigenous people of southwest Louisiana. Stanley did not start out as a Zydeco artist, but he continuously worked as an organist from the late 1950’s throughout the 1960’s and well into the 1970’s. Dural concentrated on rhythm and blues, backing well known acts such as Joe Tex, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, among many others. As a mature musician in 1976, he agreed to be hired as a backing organist for Zydeco pioneer, Accordionist Clifton Chenier and his Louisiana Red Hot Band.  It was the turning point in his career because it was through this professional relationship that Dural came to be, like Chenier, proficient on the piano-accordion. Stanley Dural, Jr. then recast himself as a Zydeco musician and formed his own band, Buckwheat Zydeco and debuted with One for the Road in 1979. Since then, Dural and his band have become one of the most renowned Blues and Zydeco acts. Buckwheat Zydeco is distinguished as being among the few Zydeco artists to find mainstream success in the music industry and he is the only accordionist of any genre to ever reach that level of recognition in recent times in America.

Throughout three decades, Buckwheat Zydeco has performed and toured extensively around the world. They have also performed at the 1996 Summer Olympics closing ceremonies, and for both of President Clinton’s inaugurations. Buckwheat Zydeco has performed and recorded with major names in the business such as Eric Clapton, Bono and U2, The Boston Pops Orchestra, Paul Simon, Keith Richards, Robert Plant, Willie Nelson, Mavis Staples, Ry Cooder and Los Lobos.  The band has also appeared on television numerous times and was chosen by Jimmy Fallon for his final show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. They have  appeared on Late Night with David Letterman, The Today Show, MTV, BET, CNN and have been featured on news programs on NBC, CBS and National Public Radio. Buckwheat Zydeco has appeared numerous times at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, as well as the Chicago Blues Festival, the Newport Folk Festival, the Montreux Jazz Festival and countless major music festivals and venues across America.

Nominated several times for the Grammy Award, Buckwheat Zydeco won for ‘Best Zydeco or Cajun Album” for Lay Your Burden Down in 2010. They also received an Emmy for music performed in the CBS television movie Pistol Pete: The Life and Times of Pete Maravich. The music of Buckwheat Zydeco has been  featured in the movies, The Waterboy, Fletch Lives, Hard Target, Ya La Tengo and Bob Dylan’s I’m Not There. The band also made an appearance and performed in The Big Easy, a movie that is credited with revitalizing Zydeco and Cajun music in America. Buckwheat Zydeco’s version of the classic “Cryin’ in the Streets” is featured on the album for Hurricane Katrina, Our New Orleans: A Benefit Album for the Gulf Coast.

Because of his commitment to promoting Louisiana cuisine, Dural wrote and performed the theme music for the PBS television series, Pierre Franey’s Cooking in America. Out of that interest, in 2014, Dural and his long time manager and collaborator, Ted Fox, premiered the You Tube documentary series “Buckwheat’s World”. The online show focuses on the music and colorful lifestyle of the artist, Stanley Dural, Jr. who became known as Buckwheat Zydeco.  Dural and Fox have shown their skill as writers and commentarians by becoming bloggers for The Huffington Post in 2014, with their first post, “Mardi Gras Is The Flip Side of the Blues”.

Buckwheat Zydeco

Ami Saraiya & The Outcome

Ami Saraiya II

Ami Saraiya

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana It has long been a challenge to bring the piano accordion to a new generation of Americans. But, by using the instrument more and more, Alternative musicians, or artists who write and perform outside of the present musical mainstream, are giving the accordion  a lot of exposure.  Artists such as Ami Saraiya and her band, The Outcome, are examples of this growing trend of young musicians who seek different ways to express their own unique style in a new age.

The piano accordion is” like having a symphony in your hands” Ami Saraiya says. “I picked it up and I was in love. It’s very rhythmic, and since I grew up playing piano, it came very easy.”  Trained as a classical pianist, Ami was a former music major at Indiana University. “I started playing piano when I was 5, and when I was growing up I was always singing and in choir….but the classical world was not for me. I joined a band when I was 19 and found my niche.”” Ami was the lead vocalist of pop collective Radiant Darling and R&B band Pelvic Delta, and has toured locally and regionally throughout the U.S.

Ami Saraiya

Ami Saraiya

Coming out of the Chicago music scene, the songs of Ami Saraiya reveal a distinct part of that American urban aesthetic, and reveal to us how she experiences her world. With original songwriting and instrumentation, Ami interprets it through a wide range of instruments.  Along with her voice, she performs with  the accordion, guitar, violin,  and xylophone and other instruments, as well. Whether with the roar of any Pop icon or the soft and sultry style of a chanteuse, her live performance is captivating. Amy Saraiya always sings and writes with  deep conviction, while she totally “shreds” on the accordion.

As a songwriter, “I create what I feel. I start with an idea and do lots of work out from there, but it’s just raw perspective — I’m not trying to create something in particular. What I do comes from the heart, and the hard work comes in finishing what you started. Ideas come and they aren’t always understandable, but I manage to find some transcendence.”

 Ami Saraiya and The Outcome received excellent reviews with Saraiya’s first album under her own name entitled, “Archeologist” in 2009. She followed up with an EP entitled “Purging” which critics thought dark, “surrealistic” and “the best tracks she’s ever produced”(Joseph Montes, Loud Loup Press). With her second album, released in 2012, “Soundproof Box,” the singer/songwriter/bandleader “showcases the performer’s creative energy and intensity….vintage cabaret sound is drama in bold relief, swinging from playful to maudlin in a single measure.” (Jessica Hopper, The Chicago Tribune).


The Outcome, including Marc Piane (upright bass), Ronnie Kuller (violin), Gary Kalar, (electric guitar), Shirley Caen Rogiers (vocals), and Courtney Glascoe (vocals).

Ami Saraiya & The Outcome

Ami Saraiya & The Outcome

Making Music, Texas Style: Debra Peters and The Love Saints Band

Debra Peters

Photo by Jay Hudson

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana   Austin, Texas is home to one of the most diverse musical landscapes in the United States. The accordion has always had a role in the local music scene from the advent of the town’s German Beer Halls in the 1800’s, through the evolution of Tex-Mex music. Because of this presence, the accordion is alive and well represented in Texas music, today.

One of the most popular and respected Texas accordionists is Debra Peters. For the last 24 years, she has consistently performed in Austin and all around Texas with her band, Debra Peters and The Love Saints Band. Debra is a career singer, songwriter, accordionist, pianist and session musician. Also, well-known in Austin as a teacher of the accordion, she is an entrepreneur, producing and marketing her own music recordings and accordion educational videos.

Women musicians who have their own bands are rare. But, a woman musician with the professional longevity that Debra Peters has shown, are all the more rare. Monthly, for the last 2 decades, Debra Peters has appeared at the legendary Broken Spoke in Austin.  Also, throughout that time, Debra and her band have toured Europe, Japan, Mexico, North America and Hawaii.  Debra Peters and The Love Saints Band were featured at the International Accordion Festival held in San Antonio, Texas. They are scheduled to appear at the upcoming 2016 Texas Folk Life Festival in Austin.  This marks the 32nd anniversary for Texas FolkLife, which was started in 1984.  The festival presents and honors the diverse cultures and living heritage of the Lone Star State.  Tex-Mex and Zydeco/Cajun music are represented in The Love Saint’s Band’s repertoire along with Americana, polkas and other dance music. The daughter of a Canadian railroad engineer, Debra enjoys performing a selection of railroad songs, as well.

As an accordion educator, Debra has presented workshops every year for the past 12 years.  ” I am a lifelong music student as well as a lifelong music teacher. Around every corner, there is always something more and great to learn!” Her vision of producing and marketing her own accordion educational videos came out of a workshop held in Las Vegas. Upon viewing an accordion lesson video done by another accordionist, Debra remembered that, as a child, she was introduced to the piano by a lesson video on VCR. At that moment, she determined that she would create her own lesson videos. “It was almost like I was stung by a bee!” Immediately, she went to work to produce an educational video and, in 2005 created The Blues, Chords and Chops. The reaction from her students was positive and in 2007, Debra created The Blues ,Chords and Chops, Volume II.  Since then, she has produced and marketed other video accordion lessons, including one that focuses on bass patterns for the Stradella bass keyboard, 25 Bass Patterns. It was a lot of work for the already busy musician to “write and present the lessons, film and edit them, design the covers, produce the actual copies, set up the mail system, build a website, and do the marketing.” She persevered, and today sales from her web site are healthy and she has plans for more lesson videos.

Debra Peters

Debra Peters

Her enthusiasm for the accordion and her passion for people is evident. Debra strives to encourage others to play the accordion, especially girls and other women. A hardworking professional musician, Debra Peters is inspired, not only to entertain, but to empower others who seek to become skillful accordionists locally and in places far away from her Austin, Texas home. Update: Debra Peters and The Love Saints Band have been invited to participate August 20-21, 2016 at the Cotati Accordion Festival, Cotati California.

Love Saints Music, Austin Texas USA

Boogie Woogie and Blues Master, Christian Dozzler, Accordionist

Christian Dozzler

Christian Dozzler

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana Those folks who know Texas and know the Blues probably know that Christian Dozzler plays a sultry Blues piano and organ and a mean harp. What they may not know is that Dozzler, also known as “Vienna Slim”, is a master of the Boogie Woogie and Blues and also an enormously talented accordionist.

Standing 6 feet 7 inches, Dozzler is a shy man. When he was just 13 years old, he was captivated by the Boogie Woogie from the first time he heard it on the radio. He immediately quit his classical piano lessons and from then on, made it his business to master the Blues and the Boogie Woogie, and to make it his life’s work.

In his first band, Christian played guitar and harmonica as well as the piano and also sang. In a few years, he added the piano accordion.”The accordion is often misunderstood by people, because it appears in almost every folk music in the world. My influence, of course, is the Zydeco music. But I think it is a great instrument to solo on, I often use saxophone or organ phrases in my accordion solos, I think. I come from a rather puristic blues attitude, but my taste has opened up to a much wider spectrum over the years. While many blues musicians of my generation, especially here in the US, have started with rock music and then went back to the roots, I actually started with 1930s piano blues and boogie woogie and then chronologically went up in the blues history with the styles I listened to and tried to play…..But I myself try to play a wide variety of different styles within the blues framework, write much of my own material and avoid overplayed standards that everybody else plays too. In my choice of songs that I cover, I look for the hidden gems: great songs that are not so well known.”

For nearly 10 years until 1993, Christian was the co-frontman of one of Europe’s few blues bands, the reknowned Mojo Blues Band. He left to form his own band, Blues Wave, and for 7 years, toured with them nationally and internationally. He produced his first solo album “All Alone and Blue” and  today, Christian Dozzler tours Europe and North American, performing mostly as a solo act.  He has since moved permanently to the U.S. from his native Austria and has made the Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas area his home since 2000.

Christian Dozzler was nominated for the Blues Critic Awards in 2008, for “Best Blues Keyboardist” (Piano, Organ, Accordion,Harmonica and vocal). He has been featured on over 40 cd’s and has met and played with many Blues greats and legends. Because of this exposure throughout his career, his musical influences are broad. “But out of the probably 5,000 or more gigs that I’ve played in my life it is hard to pick out a special one. It is always an honor to play with a legend or somebody you have admired for many years, that’s for sure… But I like jamming with other musicians after a festival, or sitting in with other bands that I know and like….. maybe the most fun I had was at an organized jam at the Salmon Arm Festival in Canada a few years ago. It was part of the program and they just sat 6 or 7 individual musicians on a stage in a half circle and watched what happened.”

About being a musician, Christian reflects, “…I like to listen and observe, in every life situation. And that is very important (as a professional musician) in a band context as well. You have to listen to what everybody in the band is doing and intuitively react to it or even anticipate it. How you accompany a singer or soloist is just as –if not more- important than what you do on your own solo. That’s the biggest problem with a lot of “wannabe” musicians, they don’t listen to what’s going on stage, and they just concentrate on themselves. Most of the greatest musicians, at least the ones that I respect, are also good accompanists. Because they do whatever the song needs, not what boosts their ego.”

He says that his experiences in America, as a musician, are far different than abroad. “(In Europe)..there is a respect for the artist on stage. In the U.S.…there is free live music on every corner, blues is an every-day thing that everybody grew up with, and most people cannot even distinguish between good and mediocre musicians or real and fake. They want to be entertained, dance and have a good time, and often don’t even care who the person on the bandstand is. So that’s a completely different approach for the musician…”

Christian Dozzler has seen many changes in the music industry since he became a professional musician. He says, “The CD/album sales have gone down drastically over the last decade or so. It used to be that buying an album was the only way for you to listen to the music at home. Now you can download it, listen anytime on internet radio, watch it for free on YouTube, you don’t need to necessarily own a product anymore. And especially in a niche market like the Blues, this has the effect that it almost makes no sense anymore to produce a CD. In the 90s I used to break even with the production costs within 6-8 months, now it might take 2 years or more.”

But, Christian says that there are more changes underway, “The particular problem that Blues and also Jazz seem to have worldwide is also that our audience is growing too old –like we are. There are not enough young people coming up who are interested in our style of music to fill the gap.” He adds, “I can only hope that more young people, in spite of all the distractions from the internet, cable TV and superficial pop culture, would get a chance to discover the heartbeat of the blues.”

Christian Dozzler II

Christian Dozzler

All quotes from “Christian Dozzler: Two Meters of Blues” by Michalis Limnios BLUES @ GREECE

C.J. Chenier, Louisiana Accordionist


C.J. Chenier

John Mayall had no goal other than “to make a normal blues album” , which is what the veteran artist and bandleader has done over the course of his 51-year recording career. And if you start adding it up, after 50 years, it’s obviously quite a career.” Mayall recorded “A Special Life,” his first release in five years for Forty Below Records, during a three-day session with his band during November at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood. It features four originals — one written by band members Greg Rzab and Rocky Athas — plus covers of songs by Jimmy Rogers, Albert King, Sonny Landreth and others. Mayall’s band is also bolstered by accordionist C.J. Chenier on several tracks, including a version of his father Clifton Chenier’s “Why Did You Go Last Night” that kicks off the album. “That was one of the songs I’ve always had a fondness for,” Mayall says. “In fact, we used to play it when Jack Bruce was in the band, so it goes that far back, and it’s far less Zydeco than straightahead blues. I thought it was a perfect time to approach C.J.; his father wrote and sang the song originally, and he was available, so I just contacted him. I hadn’t met him before, but he flew in for the day and we nailed it. It was a really great experience.”

C.J.  Chenier grew up in the 1960s, in the housing projects of his native Port Arthur, Texas, where he was aware of, but not exposed to his father’s music as a young child.

Upon first listening to his father’s music, Chenier thought all the songs sounded the same. But he eventually began to appreciate and master his style, as he later joined and then took over his father’s band and career.  He has since played such venues as the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, San Diego’s Street Scene and Milwaukee’s SummerfestPaul Simon first heard Chenier in 1990, and featured him on the The Rhythm of the Saints album, and that year’s ‘Born At The Right Time’ tour. In 1992 Chenier played accordion on “Cajun Song”, a track on the Gin Blossoms‘ album, New Miserable Experience. 1992 saw Chenier featured with the Red Hot Louisiana Band on the PBS music television program Austin City Limits.[3] By October 1994 Chenier was signed by Alligator. His debut release there was Too Much Fun, named the next year as best zydeco album of 1995 by Living Blues magazine. In 1995, Chenier gained his widest audience to date with television appearances on the Jon Stewart Show and CNN. His 1996 appearance at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival was featured in a segment by the VH1cable music television network, as well as by Entertainment Weekly. Chenier and the band also appeared that year at the Austin, Texas, 1996 SxSW Music Conference, a special event for Alligator Records’ 25th anniversary. Chenier won the 1997 Living Blues’ Critics’ Poll Award and also an AFIM Indie Award for best zydeco album, for his next release, The Big Squeeze. In 2001, Chenier played in front of 60,000 fans at the Chicago Blues Festival.

The Enigmatic Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands

Crystal Bright III

Crystal Bright (Photos by Christopher Lubinski)

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana Sometimes a performer emerges with the potential to completely redefine our impression of musical performance using the piano accordion. Crystal Bright has shown she has courage to dare to push the envelope a little farther, dig a little deeper and forge a path to go beyond what is merely expected and acceptable.

Crystal Dawn Bright was born in Annapolis, Maryland, in 1981 and raised in Mount Pleasant, North Carolina. She began piano lessons at the age of seven, and while growing up, performed in musicals and studied drama. After earning her B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and M.A. from Florida State University, Crystal traveled, studied and worked from Spain to Yellowstone. Something that she had previously read resonated with Crystal. It was a book that she credits as influencing her creative path, and one that continues to motivate her today, Clarissa Pinkola Estes’, Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype.

She deliberately sought to absorb all that she could that is magical and wild in the world, inspired by thoughts such as these:

  • “Go out in the woods, go out. If you don’t go out in the woods nothing will ever happen and your life will never begin.”
  • “I hope you will go out and let stories, that is life, happen to you, and that you will work with these stories from your life– not someone else’s life–water them with your blood and tears and your laughter till they bloom, till you yourself burst into bloom. That is the work. The only work.”
  • “Be wild; that is how to clear the river. The river does not flow in, polluted, we manage that. The river does not dry up, we block it. If we want to allow it its freedom, we have to allow our ideational lives to be let loose, to stream, letting anything come, initially censoring nothing. That is creative life.”
  • “All the ‘not readies,’ all the ”I need time,’ are understandable, but only for a short while. The truth is that there is never a ‘completely ready,’ there is never a really ‘right time.” Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run With the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype

Crystal returned to Greenboro, North Carolina, and in 2010 she formed her band, Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands. She named her band after a fairy tale by The Brothers Grimm, called ‘The Handless Maiden’. Crystal Bright said, “it is about her losing her hands and gaining them back in the end, representing her coming into her full creative and soulful self which I felt like I was doing then, and am still doing.” Crystal adds, ” I had written these songs and I needed help in creating a band and taking my music to the next level. The Silver Hands helped me create something bigger than my own hands could.”

A multi-instrumentalist in the truest sense, Crystal performs with a vast assortment of ethnic and exotic instruments, including a musical saw. She has shown that she can captivate an audience with her vocal ability and style, described as operatic and ethereal. Crystal utilizes the piano accordion; taps into and takes full advantage of the edgy, noir quality that the instrument can evoke, to effectively convey a sense of mystery,  and of darkness and light.

Crystal Bright I

Crystal Bright

Since forming her band, Crystal Bright has performed with the North Carolina Symphony, winning their Triangle Talent Search. She has earned awards for her singing performance and musicianship, songwriting, best music video ,”Drowned Out”, as well as international recognition. In 2010, the Broach Theatre in Greensboro, N.C. featured Crystal Bright’s musical theatre production, “Illuminating and Transcending the Shadow”, which she wrote, produced and directed, and in which she starred. It featured her band, The Silver Hands and a cast of sixteen costumed actors.

As a performance artist, Crystal acted, sang and performed with musical instruments, collaborating with mixed media sculptor, Grey Pascal in “20/20: Filters of Light and Insight”(2010) “Downward Spiral” (2011). Crystal Bright also co-produced and starred in her musical concert, “Bones and Lilies” along with members of the Flowjo Family Circus. Two performances featured acrobatics, interpretive dance and circus arts. The events took place at The Flowjo (2012) in Carrboro, North Carolina. A visual album by Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands, “The Absolute Elsewhere”, was performed at the Carrboro Arts Center (2014) and received positive reviews. Most recently, Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands performed an original, live score to the classic silent movie, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (2015 & 2016)

With her highly intuitive determination, Crystal takes her audience along the enchanting path that she has chosen to fashion. The direction that she will take is only beginning to unfold as Crystal Bright continues to evolve as a brilliant star

Permanent members Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands
Crystal BrightVocals, accordion, keyboards, concertina, adungu, bombo, zheng, piano, guitar, vihuela and musical saw

Current rotating members:
Aaron Bond – Double bass
Sanders Davis – Double bass
Jeremy Denman – Trumpet
Jeremy Haire – Acoustic guitars
Robbie Link – Double bass
Seth Oldham – Drums
Bradley Spencer – Mandolin

Crystal Bright and The Silver Hands has performed at over 500 concerts including:
South By Southwest
Savannah Stopover
Midpoint Music Fest
The Steampunk World’s Fair,
Shakori Hills


June 2010: Crystal Bright & the Silver Hands

March 2012: Muses & Bones

April 2013: Live on All Hallows’ Evening’

May 2015: The Absolute Elsewhere 


Crystal Bright II

Ten Things You Can Do to Promote the Accordion

By Christa T. for Accordion Americana Whether you are a new student of the accordion or you are again getting back to playing it, here are some thoughts as we “advance the cause” of reintroducing the accordion to America. (Please note that I am not creating a list of ‘rules’, but, rather, ‘talking points’. Use what you can, but it’s expected that there may be some point that you don’t agree with, or have found that it works differently for you. This article is protected by copyright and can only be used with my permission.)

1)    Safeguard your instrument.

  • It is expensive and not a toy.
  • It is your property so don’t allow anyone to touch it, put it on and try to play it without your permission.
  • Set your boundaries and stick to them.
  • Treat your accordion like it’s your best friend, your child, or your pet by not leaving it outside in the rain, in a hot car, or alone.
  • On a gig, carry it with you when you take a break.
  • Remember that you are responsible if anything happens to your instrument.

2)    Stand up when you perform so that the audience can see you.

  • You are more likely to interact with them, move more freely, play more expressively, make eye contact and be more entertaining. Seated accordionists have a tendency to look down and away from the audience, which makes the performer seem remote and aloof, and your audience could feel shut out. Your intention should be to ‘engage’ the audience in your performance and establish an emotional connection.
  • If you are unable to stand, perhaps your piano accordion is too heavy for you. You could exercise to build strength or get a smaller or lighter accordion. Accordions built today with new age materials, weigh substantially less than in the past. A disproportionately large accordion can be distracting. It should fit your body, be comfortable and have enough bass keys for you.
  • Perhaps getting more thickly padded shoulder straps for your instrument may help to distribute the weight and may also help If you have shoulder strap slippage.
  • A back strap will keep straps from slipping off of your shoulders, but if you need assistance or must go through some gymnastics to secure it, then it may look like you are having a problem with it. Having someone help you with your back strap, backstage, will mean that you will be walking onto the stage with your accordion already on. You may not be able to see equipment and electrical lying around and could trip and fall. And that may be a problem.
  • If you ask yourself, “What do other musicians do?”, the answer is:  they walk confidently onto the stage, put their instrument on, perform while standing, then easily remove their instrument and leave the stage when finished. Just as any professional musician would do with any instrument, you should strive to do the same with your accordion, without any problem. 

Jenny Conlee II

Jenny Conlee of The Decemberists

3)    Practice with a purpose. There is much to be said about how to practice.

  • Practice systematically every day for an hour.
  • No matter what type of instrument you have, practice the bass section of your accordion. Other musicians don’t ignore half of their instrument!  Knowing the bass is essential to give your music dimension and depth, so, know them and don’t be afraid to use them.
  • Practice your bellows action so it is as smooth as possible. Work with your accordion teacher on phrasing, or when to inhale, and exhale (much like a singer does) with the bellows.
  • Have a list of songs, about 6 at a time. Systematically play each, one after the other, every day for a week. At the end of the week, the best one drops off (assuming you know the piece well enough) and is put on a different list of songs that you already know. At some point, perhaps once per week you will revisit those songs and refresh your memory.  Another song that you plan to learn is placed on your practice list, to replace the song that you removed from the list. This system will guarantee that you are always working on new songs, yet not forgetting the songs that you took time to learn. Or come up with your own system.  It’s all about managing your time and effort, and you shouldn’t waste either.
  • Work with a metronome to check that your speed and timing are consistent.
  • Practice your performance by beginning with a quick introduction, getting into the piece quickly, taking your time with it to play it well, then end it smoothly. Why do you need an introduction? So you can settle into the song and draw the listener in. It gives you a chance to get the right tempo and reminds you if you are in the right key.
  • The piece should be arranged and appropriate for the accordion, for you and for the setting.
  • Do not just “wing it”. Put a great deal of thought and care into how you present yourself. Dress to fit the setting and for your performance. Strive to perform each piece from memory, not sheet music or an Ipad. As a musician, you are not just playing music, you are interpreting it and giving a performance.
  • Time each piece so you know how long you will need for your performance. Really great performers spend copious amounts of time on preparation, so that it is second nature after awhile.

4)  Choose music that is special. Song choice is important to your audience and affects their perception of you.

  • Don’t feel you have to “play everything”, then perform passably or even badly; or comply with requests to “play a polka” if you are unwilling to learn to play them well–they are a very demanding genre.
  • Choose a musical genre that you love, dedicate yourself to those songs, and get proficient at playing that type of music. Develop a clearly thought out vision with goals and objectives and decide what you are trying to accomplish, as a musician. Depending on that vision, selecting from multiple genres might be a good objective. Whatever you decide to do is up to you.
  • If you can’t find any songs you care about, compose your own music. Take time to arrange and practice your songs so you can perform them well and subject them to the same care and high standards as you would had they been written by a well-known composer.

5)    Be sensitive to how the accordion is presented to others.

  • By not being well presented, any musical instrument can be annoying. Getting together with fifteen other accordionists (or fifteen of any one instrument, for that matter) is fine if you have a club and want to share ideas. But, please recognize that more than two at a time in public, especially in unison, is too intense for most audiences. To those maniacs that think it is fun, as a group, to use accordions to assault diners with obnoxious performances, I am sure that these events are counterproductive. This approach does not teach people to care about the accordion. In fact, it’s easy to predict that a negative impression of this instrument will be formed or reinforced by such shenanigans.

gang of accordion players

  • Referring to it as a “squeezebox” is inaccurate because the accordion is a musical instrument, not a silly noisemaker.
  • By using the accordion as a prop or as a lame joke, the image of the accordion is seriously diminished.

accordion cartoon

Accordion sign

Welcome to Heaven 001

 Substitute ‘guitar’ for ‘accordion’, and suddenly it’s not funny.

  • This doesn’t imply you can’t strive to be humorous and entertaining. But, take the accordion or whatever instrument you play, seriously, and have some respect for your time and effort.   Think of it this way: if you owned a business and produced a product for sale, it would be a bad business strategy to teach people that your product was a joke. People will not buy your product.  If you are a musician/singer/songwriter,  you want your audience to “buy” into your music, support you and respect you. They won’t if you treat yourself and your instrument as though it is a joke. If you are making fun of the accordion, you are not promoting it, effectively. Perception begins with you because you are the one in control at that moment. Reach higher, and set grander goals for yourself as an artist. Sell your audience on the concept that you are special and  have something special to show them on an instrument that is special. But, before you can accomplish that objective, you have to believe it, yourself.

Charlie Gillingham of Counting Crows

  • Know who you are and who your audience will be. The more you understand, the better you can anticipate and plan your performance.
    •By showing pride in yourself, your performance and your instrument of choice, your audience will respect you and recognize that you care about them.

Tink Lloyd

Tink Lloyd of the Grand Slambovian’s Circus of Dreams

6)    Try to mainstream the accordion by starting a band where the accordion isn’t the usual instrument and you are the only accordionist in the group.

  • It can be an unexpected delight to both the audience and to the other musicians in the group.
  • By treating the accordion as though it’s just like any other instrument, ironically, enhances how special and how cool it is. This, more than anything else, promotes the accordion.
  • Here is an exquisite song, Silver Line  by Americana Singer/Songwriter Ray Tarantino, accompanied, beautifully, by Joe First, Accordionist:

  • To be a good accordionist, you don’t have to be the fastest or the loudest player, although that may be a part of what you do. But, keep in mind that music is not an athletic event, and musicians are artists.
  • A good musician is one who is sensitive and knows when to alternate between using restraint and showmanship, when to blend in and when to stand out.
  • A musician is always attempting to emotionally connect with the listener and also to make any artistic judgement as to what the music needs at that moment.

7)    Find your voice! 

  • Sing with the accordion, and learn harmony. Singing with the accordion is seen more now than in the recent past. Sheryl Crow gave a fantastic performance accompanying herself with the accordion, when she sang her hit song, “Strong Enough”.

Although she does nothing with the bass section of her instrument, what I particularly love about Sheryl Crowe’s method of playing is that she is a ‘partner’ with her accordion, harmonizing with it and giving it equal time to be heard along with her voice. She could have simply left the accordion in the background, blandly structuring chords to support her voice. Instead, she chose to use a more dynamic approach, which gives her song fullness and warmth and it allows the accordion to have a real presence in her music.

Mewithoutyou Aaron Weiss

Aaron Weiss of Mewithoutyou

8)    Be visible.

  • Leave your comfort zone and go out and busk! “Busking” is giving a live performance in a public place. You should check with your city about any ordinances that prohibit busking and where it is permitted. If you get out of your comfort zone you will become more comfortable, confident and perform better each time.
  • Live performance is a great way to “test market” your sound, your songs, your image and your ability to relate to an audience. It gives you a chance to assess their reaction to you and what you do. It also helps you to get over your apprehension about appearing in front of others. After a very short while, you are “over it”. You realize that nothing bad will happen to you. People may laugh….but, guess what? You haven’t melted and run away.
  • To those that try to heckle you with their demands because they think they can, just smile, and ignore them (or if they cross your boundaries, either call the police or call it a day.) Performing helps you “build a backbone”, develop patience and character and helps you to learn who you are as a creative individual. Joey Cook busked with her accordion for quite some time before trying out for American Idol in 2015, as a vocalist, rising to be one the top seven finalists! Good for you, Joey!
Joey Cook

Joey Cook

  • Look for opportunities to perform in front of others. Some hospitals and nursing facilities look for live performers to entertain their patients. Seniors at your local Senior Center may enjoy a performance from you.
  • Join a musical “meet up” group where there are people who play a variety of musical instruments.
  • Take advantage of “open mic” nights that are locally held at restaurants, coffee shops and theatres in your area.
  • Listen to others as well as perform.  Look for those who are positive, empowering and who enjoy being creative with their music and performance. Good people generate good energy and they can get everyone excited about being there.
  • Don’t be afraid to reach out to others for inspiration or collaboration. Also, competition can be interesting. When two collaborate on a song, one can challenge the other to solo to see what you both can create, individually.
  • If available, there is nothing better than an old-fashioned talent contest that will require one to focus and rise to the challenge.
  • In addition to hiring an accordion teacher, take a class about performance to enhance your professionalism.
  • Even if you don’t become a professional entertainer or musician, what you learn by being visible is “portable” and can be transferred to other pursuits in your life. It can make you a stronger person and less likely to feel intimidated by uncertainty or by others.

Bruce Hornsby

Bruce Hornsby

9)    Never give up.

  • If something does not work for you on the accordion, revisit and find out what or how it can work on this instrument. It may be the smallest of details that you haven’t considered that might be bogging you down.
  • Ask your accordion teacher or other musicians for their opinion about your song choice and delivery and how you may improve on your instrument.
  • Listen to others that are more experienced than you are.
  • Model yourself after someone you admire. Your idol doesn’t need to be an accordion player. Art Van Damme, the great Jazz accordionist, admired Benny Goodman, the big band leader and clarinetist. Art successfully learned Goodman’s techniques and applied them to the accordion.
  • Do not listen to anyone who recommends that you change to another instrument. They are not well-intended and do not have your interests at heart.
JoAnne Castle

Jo Ann Castle c. 1957 .

10)   Pass on your knowledge to other people.

  • Try to engage their interest by showing them a different kind of music than has been associated with this instrument. The accordion was removed from mainstream American music at a critical time in pop music history. Someone decided that the accordion should not be involved with American music , when it really could have been. As a result, it was left out of the music scene for decades.
  • For performing accordionists that seek publicity, keep in mind that information control is everything. What is said or written about you and your efforts instantly forms an image and an opinion in the minds of the public. It can get people motivated to come out and hear you play. That’s the point of publicity. Or it can completely turn them off, so that they simply stay home.You can do yourself and other accordionists an enormous favor if you do NOT allow the typically mentioned image tarnishing words and phrases to be embodied in your write ups: any reference to accordion humor, any mention of a certain big band leader who was an accordion player from long ago , the word “polka” unless they are what you do, or any language that is detrimental to you or your instrument of choice. Move the writer forward and away from the stupid accordion jokes, and the distant past of the accordion. All of these are a waste of your time and a ‘road to nowhere’ for you and your instrument. Mention it to the writer, at first contact, and provide a bio that outlines interesting facts that will help them find an angle for your write up. Insist that they focus on your music, your tour and you as an artist.  You deserve the best publicity that you can get, so be involved and be prepared to established the ground rules. If you aren’t sure, write your own promotional material.
  • If you are living in America, doesn’t it make sense to promote the music that is rooted in America, and not just play the music of the rest of the world? By the way, those folks perform their own music, brilliantly. Like us, their music represents who they are as a people and has evolved from their shared experience. It is their identity. They have lived it, and they own it. But, after four hundred years, America has developed its own identity, and surrounding us is music that reflects that fact.

  • People in the U.S. don’t seem to realize that the accordion is not new to American music. It has been a part of our pioneer experience and has been in America since the mid 1800’s. It has been played, not only in the mountains and the bayous, but by folks in the city and in the country, on the prairie and in the desert, for a long, long time. It was used in American churches and schools, in taverns, at dances and social gatherings for over 150 years. Because it was portable, the accordion was used when pianos and organs were too heavy or delicate to transport. Accordions continued to participate throughout the 20th Century, along with pianos and organs, fiddles and guitars. It was used in the early Blues, the Boogie Woogie, Gospel and every American genre of music. The accordion is a critical piece of our music history and we should be proud of that connection, celebrate it and hold the accordion in high regard because of it.

  • But, the accordion must participate in current music to survive. It has to, or it will die out. So, please, take your accordion–whatever type you prefer– go and find your audience, and make the most out of any opportunity!