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West Texas’ Own, Ponty Bone

Ponty Bone II

Ponty Bone

Christa T. for Accordion Americana Ponty Bone always knew he was different. “…I always thought of myself as some sort of artist…a character in a novel, all my life…I knew something was up.” Harry DePonta Bone, or “PB” to his friends, started playing the accordion when he was five years old, but dropped it several years later to study the trumpet. Little did he know that one day, he would come back to that first instrument and in time, become an institution in the heart of the West Texas music scene and internationally recognized as an Americana accordionist.

Ponty Bone was born and grew up in San Antonio. Because musicians lives are never easy, Ponty decided to do the wise thing and go to college at Texas Tech in Lubbock. Soon, he found himself with a wife, twin daughters and a job as a surveyor and draftsman living in Arizona, just trying to make ends meet. But, he wanted more. Mostly, he wanted to be back in Texas working as a musician.  Looking for any excuse, Ponty and his family always headed back in the direction of Texas. In the late sixties, while living in Phoenix, Ponty and his wife, Sarah started their first band, New Moan Hey and began playing gigs in Texas, beginning with The Vulcan Gas Company in Austin. Sarah, it has been noted, was a pretty good singer. But, for whatever reason, their marriage ended in 1976.

For Ponty, from the first band began long associations, performing and recording, with some of the best musicians in the music business, from Austin to L.A.  It’s hard not to talk about Ponty’s career without mentioning Lubbock, Texas because Ponty Bone has been so closely associated with the town and its music scene since the early 1970’s. He explains, “”Lubbock’s always been a lucrative market. A lot of great bands came out of Lubbock. And a lot of great bands came to Lubbock. A lot of ‘em were there because of, something a little bit more on the intellectual side of the equation. Like being in a band, or going to Texas Tech, or having some kind of a connection with the arts…”

But, Lubbock is more than your average college town. From the city’s night clubs emanated some of the grittiest and most visceral music ever produced in America. Key hot spots were the “Thunderbird Lounge”, the “Cotton Club” and “Stubb’s Bar-B-‘Que”. “Stubb’s” is on the city’s Eastside and at that time, was exclusively an African American night club. A guitarist changed that and put the club on the map. His name was Jesse Taylor, with whom Ponty Bone collaborated, from the time Jesse was a hard rocking, tattooed, self taught sixteen year old white kid who lived not far from “Stubb’s”. This association lasted until Jesse Taylor’s untimely death at age 55 in 2006. Both Jesse and Ponty eventually became members, touring internationally with The Joe Ely Band.

Joe Ely, a Lubbock born musician and band leader of international renown,  is a pivitol  figure in the life of Ponty Bone. Both met in the clubs in Lubbock and came to know each other well as musicians, and they knew everyone that played in and around the area.  One day, as Ponty describes, “Joe Ely drives up on his bicycle. He says, ‘Hey, Ponty. It looks like MCA is gonna do my first album. Listen, we’re getting together tonight over at my house on 9th Street; Man, get your accordion and come over there and jam with us! I got some songs I want you to play on the album.'” It was a fortuitous conversation that led Ponty to tour, perform and record with the Joe Ely Band for seven years prior to forming his own group, The Squeezetones which has been in existence for the past two decades.

Ponty Bone performs with Joel Guzman At Squeezebox Mania 2009:

Ponty Bone shows off his own brand of great musicianship on the accordion playing the blues.

Throughout his career and residency in Lubbock, as well as in Phoenix and Austin, wherever he has performed, domestically or internationally, PB has delighted and entertained and has always been in the best of musical company. He is hailed as an outstanding musician and revered as one of the most interesting and charismatic performers.  It’s that personality that makes one “different”.

Tragically, Ponty Bone was diagnosed in 2015 with a neurodegenerative disease called Progressive Supranuclear Palsy or PSP.  It is a brain disease of no known origin and it is eventually fatal.  PSP impairs all movement, balance, vision, speech and swallowing, yet it allows the victim to remain conscious and aware, with all mental capacity and personality intact. In a nutshell, it means one is a prisoner within one’s own body, left with no means of communication or expression.

His daughter Leah, writes, “Knowing PB, what he would appreciate… is to see the support and encouragement from you all through notes…. emails to him, letters or photos in the mail, or even better, visits, if you’re here in Central Texas. Again, even though he won’t be able to fully reciprocate, rest assured that the way our Dad lights up, in his own way, when he sees old friends or receives an email from an old fan, is something that speaks far louder than words ever could. If you need help reaching Ponty via email, mail or in person, please contact us.

Ponty Bone
P.O. Box 163421
Austin, Texas 78716 U.S.A.
PHONE: (512) 443-7952
pb@pontybone.com

All quotes from:

Fire in the Water, Earth in the Air: Legends of West Texas Music
by Christopher Oglesby
Published by the University of Texas Press

Thank you to Debra Peters for her input regarding this article

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Corey Ledet & His Zydeco Band

 

coreyledet-ii

Corey Ledet

COREY LEDET KICKS UP HIS GAME WITH “STANDING ON FAITH”

Parks, LA — CPL Records proudly announces the release of Grammy-nominated Zydeco innovator, singer/songwriter/accordion player COREY LEDET & HIS ZYDECO BAND’s “STANDING ON FAITH” (his ninth album) on MARCH 3, 2017. “STANDING ON FAITH” was co-produced by Cecil Green and Jesse Delgizzi and recorded at the Green Room in Ville Platte, LA. Joining Ledet (Accordions/Drums/Vocals/Washboard) in the studio were Delgizzi (Guitar/Bass/Moog/Vocals) and Green (Keyboards).

Ledet injects pop, funk, rhythm-and-blues and reggae on “STANDING ON FAITH”.  In doing so, he continues to work from the genre-splicing template set by such zydeco pioneers as Clifton Chenier and Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural. After opening with the funky, Prince-like “Intro,” “STANDING ON FAITH,” continues with the upbeat zydeco-pop instrumental, “Love Never Felt So Good”; stays positive with the album’s zydeco-pop title song; glides to breezy R&B balladry for “Take Me There”; plots a reggae course with the sunny “A Good Day”; and slips into the sleek, contemporary R&B of “Street Light.”

corey-ledet

Corey Ledet

“I don’t like to stick with something that’s easy, or just the way it’s supposed to be,” Ledet says. “I like to explore and experiment. That makes music fun. It’s like cooking. When you’re cooking a recipe, you say, let me try this with that, let me see if this works.”

During most of his 14 years as a band leader, Ledet based his repertoire on the foundation set by Clifton Chenier and other zydeco pioneers. But now he’s moving beyond the zydeco classics. “I can do that all night long,” Ledet says. “But I can do other things as well. Traditional zydeco, nontraditional, pop. I can go any which way I want. This is my way of creating a sound that fits me.”

Blending styles is challenging for Ledet, but he likes the challenge. But before he became a music mixologist, he learned the zydeco basics. “I did all the studying and research I could do,” he says. ‘It took a long time. There’s a lot to learn about zydeco and Creole music. But it’s important to know your background before you learn anything else. After I finished studying all of that, I learned other stuff that interested me. Pop music, classical music. I even listened to Frank Sinatra. People laughed at me, but I listened to anything that’s got notes.”

On the bandstand, Ledet mixes songs originally recorded by pop and country artists into his show: Bruno Mars, Prince, Michael Jackson, Jason Aldean, Darius Rucker, reggae fountainhead Bob Marley. Again, Chenier served as a model. “He mixed the old French music with rhythm-and-blues,” Ledet says. ”Ray Charles and Etta James and Louis Jordan were of Clifton’s time. That worked for him. I’m applying Cliff’s recipe to modern-day times, my way.”

At 35, Ledet brings 25 years of bandstand experience to the stage. He turned pro at 10, playing drums in his native Houston for Wilbert Thibodeaux and the Zydeco Rascals. Ledet came naturally to the drums, his first instrument. His late grandfather, Buchanan ‘Tbu’ Ledet, worked as drummer for Clifton Chenier. Although Ledet’s grandfather died in 1978, three years before his birth, the grandson idolizes his grandfather. Chenier’s longtime drummer, Robert Peter, followed the drumming example Ledet’s grandfather set in 1940s and ’50s.  “Cliff wanted a drummer who played like my grandfather,” Ledet says. “When you hear Robert, that’s my grandfather’s style.”

For Ledet, working with Thibodeaux and the Zydeco Rascals was like going to zydeco school. The lessons included such essential subjects as keeping the beat and, something less definable, reading audiences. “And whenever other drummers came in the venue, Wilbert called them up to the drums and let me play accordion,” Ledet remembers.

During his decade with Thibodeaux, Ledet organized some gigs on the side for himself as a front man. He officially launched his own band in 2003, after moving to his father’s hometown, Parks, Louisiana.  Many people ask Ledet why he left Houston for Parks, a town that has hundreds, rather than millions, of residents. Ledet already knew Parks well. When he was growing up in Houston, his family visited Parks during summers and for holidays and special occasions. “It was hard to leave to go back to Houston,” he remembers. “I like the city, but I like the country better. Some kind of spiritual connection.” On those family drives from Houston to Parks, the family tuned to a zydeco radio as soon as they got close enough to receive the signal. Once they reached Parks, the zydeco music never stopped. “I like all music,” Ledet says. “But zydeco is the first pick for music for me.”

Ledet paid his dues after he launched his career as a band leader from Parks. “I had to build everything from nothing, make my name, make my rounds, prove myself,” he says. “Playing to chairs and tables, paying my band members 10 bucks or five bucks for the night. For a long time, I didn’t make anything.”  Ledet persevered, building his music career from the muddy southwest Louisiana ground up. Highlights include his 2013 Grammy nomination for “Nothin’ But the Best,” a collaboration with fellow zydeco musicians Anthony Dopsie, Dwayne Dopsie and André Thierry. “Oh, man, when that happened, I was like, ‘Is this for real?’ Because never in a million years did I think I’d be sitting in the same row at Grammys with Taylor Swift. To come from ground zero to that, lets me know I’m doing something right. I’m kicking up my game by making records like ‘Standing On Faith.’ I want to go even further and do bigger and better things.”

Corey Ledet keeps one foot firmly in the tradition while exploring surrounding influences in order to create the best of both worlds, and is able to infuse old and new styles of Zydeco into his own unique sound. “STANDING ON FAITH” presents the best view yet of the Grammy-nominated Ledet’s expansive talent.  Corey Ledet has recently signed an exclusive representation deal with Mitchell & Matt Greenhill’s FLi Artists: fliartists.com/corey-ledet-zydeco-band.

Catch COREY LEDET & HIS ZYDECO BAND (Corey Ledet – Accordion/Vocals, Jesse DeGizzi – Bass/Vocals, Julian Primeaux – Guitar/Vocals, Gerard Delafose – Drums, Statton Doyle – Sax and Nicholas Victorian – Washboard) on tour Spring 2017 in support of his new release.

corey-ledet-iii

http://www.coreyledet.com

CONTACT:    Karen Leipziger/KL Productions

   klpzgr@earthlink.net